Will 2011 Be A Nightmarish Year For The U.S. Housing Market?

As we come to the end of 2010, there seems to be very few reasons to be optimistic about the U.S. housing market as we enter 2011.  Home prices have fallen for several months in a row, mortgage rates are going up, mortgage delinquencies are increasing again, the mortgage industry is mired in horrific legal problems and the underlying economy is still extremely sluggish.  During 2009 and throughout the first half of 2010 the U.S. housing market experienced a time of stabilization and it looked like the housing industry might recover, but when the tax breaks expired things started to get bad once again.  Now many analysts are publicly using the term “double-dip” when speaking about prospects for the U.S. housing market in 2011. (Read More...)

Home Sales Drop Once Again

Existing home sales in the U.S. are down again.  New home sales in the U.S. are down again.  What else is new?  The U.S. housing industry just cannot seem to bounce back.  Mortgage lenders have really, really tightened up lending standards and so now there are a lot fewer qualified buyers than there used to be.  It is as if the big financial institutions have nearly shut off the flow of credit.  But without credit, the vast majority of American families don’t have a prayer of achieving the American Dream of owning a home.  Even with mortgage rates close to record lows the housing market is still languishing.  Unfortunately, it doesn’t matter how low mortgage rates are if American families can’t get home loans approved.  With unemployment still staggeringly high and with incomes still declining, it appears that the U.S. housing market is going to continue to suffer for some time to come. (Read More...)

Bank Of America, JPMorgan Chase And GMAC Suspend Foreclosures Due To Serious Concerns About Foreclosure Procedures

In an absolutely stunning development, Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase and GMAC Mortgage have all suspended foreclosures in many U.S. states due to serious concerns about foreclosure procedures.  There has been an absolutely massive tsunami of foreclosures in recent years and it turns out that mortgage company officials dealing with foreclosure paperwork have not always taken the time to process each foreclosure properly.  Things have gotten so bad that a number of U.S. states have actually opened up official investigations that are looking into some of these foreclosure practices.  But what did everyone expect?  There has been such a dramatic surge in foreclosures over the past several years that it was almost inevitable that shortcuts would start to be taken.  Back in 2005, there were only about 100,000 home repossessions in the United States.  Last year there were about 1 million home repossessions in the U.S. and RealtyTrac is projecting that there will be a record 1.2 million home repossessions this year.  Needless to say, this has created a paperwork headache for mortgage companies of unprecedented magnitude. (Read More...)

15 Bone Chilling Signs That Part Two Of The Double Dip Housing Crash Has Begun

These are harrowing times for anyone trying to sell a home or for anyone who is trying to make a living in the housing industry.  But unfortunately, there are a whole lot of signs that things are about to get quite a bit worse.  U.S. home sales have hit record lows in recent months.  An increasing number of sellers have started to reduce their asking prices, and there are signs that home prices are already starting to slip substantially in many areas of the country.  Meanwhile, the inventory of unsold homes in the United States continues to rapidly increase. Home foreclosures and bank repossessions of homes continue to set all-time records.  What this all means is that the U.S. housing market is being absolutely flooded with homes for sale at a time when there are very few buyers.  There is way too much supply and not nearly enough demand and as a result home prices are being pressured downward.  The home buyer tax credits that the U.S. government was bribing home buyers with helped stabilize the U.S. housing market for a while, but now the tax credits have expired and things are getting scary out there. (Read More...)

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